Thursday, November 17, 2011

Sax From the Past

I kept meaning to post this ages ago, when I was putting up old stuff that I'd drawn, pictures I'd taken, etc.  here it finally is, though it's an awful picture-of-a-picture.

I took this photo of my saxophone during my senior year in college in a photography class.  We developed all of our own film (a glossy substance upon which images used to be captured--remember?), and a girl in the class enlightened me to the fact that instead of washing the entire sheet of photo paper with developer, you can just sponge it on as you wish.  I streaked it around and ended up with this very '80s looking image, but I liked it.  It hangs in my living room, and reminds me of the good old days. 

The things you can learn in a dark room...

3 comments:

  1. I miss looking up close at a photo and seeing silver specks instead of pixels... I actually wrote a few scenes in my NaNoWriMo project that took place in a darkroom a few years ago!

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  2. Taht is a really awesome photo. It never occurred to me to just sponge on developer. The effect is really cool.

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  3. I miss those days, too.

    That's really cool--how is your NaNo going? Mine is sucking due to computer issues! My computer fizzled, so I lost some material, and I may have to wait a few weeks to get the new laptop I want. SO--I'm relying on my work computer and the library, and buddy, that is not working. I hate, hate not finishing things I start, but alas, I may not make it to my word count on time. Other than that, I've had fun doing it, and will try to continue with it after November. Le sigh.

    Thanks for the compliment on the photo. The chick who taught me that did something really cool. She did a double exposure of a woman's face and a flower, so the images over lapped, and then she did the streaking effect with developer. It looked awesome, and even after all these years, that image is clear in my mind. I wish I had access to a darkroom to play around with that stuff again! I loved it. I even loved blindly prying the film out of the cartridge. Good times.

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